Syrup

Definition: In cooking, a syrup is a thick, viscous liquid consisting primarily of a solution of sugar in water. Syrups may include, maple syrup, fruit syrups, corn syrup, molasses, or other flavored syrups.

Food Safety Considerations: Exposure to lead from different sources has been a public health concern for many years. Lead has been proven to have adverse effects on human health, especially for the nervous system. Lead in maple syrup can come from several sources, however the primary source is from lead contamination in equipment. Maple syrup is an acidic substance (pH 3.4-6.6) that, in the presence of oxygen, can react with metal surfaces. Contact time of maple syrup with any lead-containing metal should be minimized throughout all collection, processing, and storage activities. Please visit the related links listed below for more information.

Distribution Method (Expand All | Collapse All)

You are selling your product at a farmers’ market, CSA, roadside stand, or other direct to consumer outlet


Licensing: If you are selling shelf-stable syrup that you have produced using products you have grown, you will need a Retail Food Establishment License, issued by your county health department. You may also need additional licensing and your processing facility may require inspection from your county health department. If you sell at farmers’ markets or other direct to consumer outlets in different counties, you should check with the health department in each county where you sell your product direct to consumers. Although not mandatory at this time, you may also register your processing facility with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

If you are selling shelf-stable syrup you have produced using unprocessed farm products you purchased from another Colorado producer or from a wholesaler, such as raw fruit, you will also need a Farm Product Dealers License. For more information on what is considered an unprocessed farm product, consult General Licensing Requirements.

If you are selling shelf-stable syrup produced by someone else, you are exempt from licensing but must purchase from a licensed wholesaler.

Labeling: General labeling requirements.

Sales Tax Liability: General sales tax information.

Weights and Measures: If you are selling your product by weight, you must follow the Colorado weights and measures requirements.

You are selling your product to a store, restaurant, food cart, K-12 school, university, hospital, or other retail food establishment


Licensing: To sell syrup that you have produced using products you have grown, you must first register with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) as a wholesale food manufacturing facility. Once you have registered your food manufacturing business, you may be inspected by CDPHE.  Some manufacturing processes require specific certification and/or training that must be completed before you can manufacture an acidified food or process seafood products. If you are interested in doing either of these, you should first contact the Division of Environmental Health and Sustainability at (303) 692-3620 for further information and visit wholesale food program information and requirements. If you are selling syrup using unprocessed farm products purchased from another Colorado producer or from a wholesaler, you will also need a farm product dealer license.

Note that if you are selling at farmers’ market and as a wholesaler, you will need a to obtain a retail food establishment license and register as a wholesale food manufacturer.

Labeling: General labeling requirements.

Sales Tax Liability: General sales tax information.

Weights and Measures: If you are selling your product by weight, you must follow the Colorado weights and measures requirements.

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